Film and Food

Movies reviews with matching food – eat, watch, enjoy

Native American Indians in Film

Last night I saw a fascinating documentary on Native American Indians in film. It was incredible to see the depiction of them change over the years and the trauma that earlier characterisations dealt the Native American Indian people.

Oh how we cringe when we look at the early cinema. Stereotypes were everywhere from the pathetic little woman, the overbearing and dominating males to the white people dressed up as African Americans and Native American Indians. Cringe, cringe, cringe. Audiences give a lot of grace to these films because of the era they were made. In a time of ignorance, anything was acceptable except raunch and full on violence of course.

For two hours I was humbled. I was glued to my tv screen, hungry to learn more about American history, not just through the eyes of Hollywood but from the perspective of the Native American Indians. It’s hard to know what to do with this knowledge except to remember the little people. The minorities who have been misrepresented  by people who may have meant well but failed them miserably.

The up-side is the new breed of Native American Indian filmmakers who are bringing traditional stories to life. They are written, filmed and performed by genuine Native American Indians who know what they are talking about.

In Australia, our Indigenous people are also starting to make more films. Samson and Delilah won the Camera d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 2009. This was written, directed and performed by Indigenous people. It was not necessarily a pretty picture but it was honest and it was theirs.

Political correctness often goes way over the top. But when we look at where we have come from the days where white people ruled the cinema, perhaps it doesn’t go far enough. A balance is needed so that we don’t lose variety and the joy of difference in our storytelling, so that we don’t fear difference but embrace it as another part of being human.

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7 comments on “Native American Indians in Film

  1. Pingback: The Godfather & dinner for a Don | Film and food

  2. Pingback: Best Picture – The Godfather (1972) « Oscarclub's Blog

  3. Pingback: Native American Indians in Film « Oscarclub's Blog « Filmblog

  4. Pingback: Film blog » Native American Indians in Film « Oscarclub's Blog

  5. Pingback: Native American Indians in Film « Oscarclub's Blog | Blog filmowy

  6. Pingback: Native American Indians in Film « Oscarclub's Blog | Filmblog

  7. Pingback: Native American Indians in Film « Oscarclub's Blog — Filmblog

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